Education Resources

North Carolina Museum of History

Home search by: Type - Topic - Curriculum - Advanced

All Resources

Articles

"Backward in Religious Matters": The Church in Colonial North Carolina

Many ministers who came to colonial North Carolina found their mission of spreading religion difficult due to unruly people and widespread geography. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

"Double Voting" in Robeson County: A Reminder of an Unequal Past

At one time, double voting was acceptable in Robeson County. Double voting meant that some people had two votes but others had only one vote. Find out how American Indians fought against and eliminated this unfair political practice. This article appeared in the Fall 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

"I Know How to Work": Stories of Farm Women in Stokes and Surry Counties

Read the oral histories of four women who grew up in rural North Carolina during the early 1900s. This article appeared in the Spring 1994 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

"Liberty to Slaves": the black response

The actions of African Americans, both free and enslaved, are examined against the backdrop of the Revolutionary War. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1992 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

"Measures Not at All Pleasant": Hard Times on the Home Front

The unexpected length of the Civil War created hardships on the Confederate home front that affected everyone. Food and other supply shortages were among the most common problem facing the southern army and the southern home front. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

"Respect and Encourage the Individual": Learning among the Lumbee

American Indians have different views about learning and teaching. Learn about their education traditions. This article appeared in the Spring 1997 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

"Starvation Will Stop It": Poverty on the North Carolina Home Front

A problem faced by both soldiers and civilians during the Civil War in the South was a lack of food. North Carolinians adopted a “make do or do without” attitude in response to the shortages brought on by the war. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2000 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

"The Duke" of Asheville

In 1902 a mysterious stranger arrived in Asheville, NC. He died three weeks after his arrival, probably of tuberculosis. His true identity has remained a secret, up until this day. During his tenure as the embalmed resident of the local funeral home, the citizens of Asheville playfully referred to him as “the Duke” and his corpse participated in a number of practical jokes and public displays. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

"The Great Agitator": Golden A. Frinks

Golden A. Frinks is one of the great unsung heroes of the Civil Rights movement. Those closest to Frinks called him "The Great Agitator" or "Mr. Civil Rights." He became known for nonviolent acts of civil disobedience that wore down racist political practices. This article appeared in the Fall 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

"The difference is about our land": Cherokees and Catawbas

Many people characterize the American Revolution as a war fought between the British and the American colonists. However, another group of people, the American Indians, participated in the war. In North Carolina, the Cherokee and the Catawba ultimately supported the side that they thought would best ensure the protection of their tribal lands. This article examines the actions of these two American Indian groups in North Carolina during the American Revolution. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1992 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

"Thorough Scholars and Useful Members of Society": An Education at the Burwell School

During the antebellum era usually only white males received formal schooling. However, a few private schools for antebellum white females operated in North Carolina. One of these schools, the Burwell School in Hillsborough, is examined in this article. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

"With All the Speed Imaginable": Horse Racing in North Carolina

North Carolina boasts a long history of award-winning horses and top jockeys throughout history, especially prior to the Civil War. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Lost Colony: Interpreting History Through Drama

Originally conceived as a one-season play to commemorate the 350th anniversary of Virginia Dare's birth, The Lost Colony, has continued for more than seventy-five years. Paul Green's symphonic drama ensured the mystery of the lost colonists would intrigue people from North Carolina and beyond. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Cabinetmaker's Apprentice in a Busy Shop

The story of Thomas Day, a free man of color who owned his own business in antebellum North Carolina, is examined through the experiences of an apprentice in his woodshop. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Class All Their Own: American Indians in Antebellum North Carolina

The Cherokee Indians in the antebellum period started to adopt certain aspects of “white” civilization including separation into family units as opposed to clans and modifying their government in order to avoid further relocation. Some North Carolina Cherokee lived lives closely akin to poor whites while other isolated themselves in the mountains. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Conversation with Artist Joel Queen

Joel Queen, a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, is known for his traditional pottery. He comes from a family of potters and basket weavers and he works in many different mediums, including wood and stone carving. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A County Name Changes

What do Arthur Dobbs, James Glasgow, and Nathanael Greene have in common? One North Carolina county has been named for each of these men since it was first established. Find out who these men were and why a county was named for them. This article appeared in the Spring 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Daredevil Named Tiny

At 85 pounds and just over four feet tall, Georgia Ann "Tiny" Broadwick was the first person to free-fall from an airplane. Learn about this North Carolinian's exciting daredevil exploits. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 10 October 2003.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Deadly Contest: The Stanly-Spaight Duel

What would you do if someone called you a bad name? In 1802 a war of words became so vicious between Richard Dobbs Spaight (former NC governor and candidate for state senate) and John Stanly (who had beaten Spaight in a race for Congress two years earlier) that the two dueled. After both men had fired and missed their opponent several times, Stanly’s bullet hit Spaight who died the next day. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Descendant Reflects on the Roanoke Island Freedmen's Colony

From early 1862 until 1867, former slaves sought safety and community in a thriving freedmen’s colony on Roanoke Island. A descendant of this group, Virginia Simmons Tillett, is interviewed about this lesser-known Civil War story. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Different Kind of Exploration: William Bartram and Science in the 1700s

While North Carolina's general outline, rivers, and American Indian population had been "discovered" by the early eighteenth century, much of the region's plant life and its uses remained unknown to the colonists. Botanists such as father and son John and William Bartram collected and studied plant life and documented their findings. William Bartram eventually became a much-respected artist and author of Travels through North and South Carolina, [and] Georgia.This article appeared in the Fall 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Drum Major for History: Honoring Dr. William H. Cartwright

Read about Dr. William H. Cartwright, one of the founders of the Tar Heel Junior Historian Association. This article appeared in the Spring 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Fine Day in the Backcountry

This article is a fictional account based on historical research and primary sources of a 14 year olds day in the Carolina backcountry during the colonial era. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Forced Migration

The first Africans, brought to America through forced migration, came as indentured servants to Jamestown, Virginia, in 1619. Africans brought to the colonies in later years were bought and sold as slaves. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Foreign Field that is Forever Changed

In Ocracoke, North Carolina, a small plot of land exists comprised of four graves surrounded by a white picket fence. This small cemetery is actually owned by the British government and is home to four sailors from the antisubmarine ship the HMS Bedforshire which was sunk by a German U-Boat off of the coast of NC in 1942 This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Golden Anniversary for the Blue Ridge Parkway

The demanding work on the Blue Ridge Parkway began in the 1930s under the direction of the Public Works Administration (a New Deal agency). This project provided work for thousands of unemployed North Carolinians during the Great Depression and resulted in a roadway that highlighted the scenic North Carolina Blue Ridge Mountains. This article originally appeared in the Spring 1985 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A League of Their Own: American Indian Basketball before Integration

Until the late 1960s, many areas of public life, including sports and schools, were segregated. From the 1920s through through 1968, the small Indian Athletic Conference provided sports competition for American Indian Schools in Robeson County, North Carolina, and nearby counties. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Life-Saving Team: Gertrude Elion and Dr. George Hitchings

Gertrude Elion and Dr. George Hitchings came from different backgrounds but teamed up in 1944 at the Burroughs Welcome Company. Their research led to medicines that fight leukemia, malaria, and AIDS. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Long and Difficult Journey Across the Atalantic

In 1585, a group of sailors, tradesmen, and soldiers traveled from England to Roanoke Island. During their long journey, they faced cramped living quarters, a meager diet, and hazardous conditions at sea. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Look Through the Lens: FSA Photographs

Many of the activities of the New Deal program the Farm Security Administration (FSA) were documented by photographers. These photos have proved a priceless historical record of American life during the Great Depression. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Look at Stickball

American Indians in what is now the southeastern United States, including the Cherokee, often played stickball, an early version of lacrosse. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Look at the Cherokee Language

The Cherokee language is a part of the Iroquois language family. Today around 22,000 people speak Cherokee, and efforts are being made to teach the language to a new generation. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Look at the Trail of Tears

Starting in 1838 the United States government forcibly removed thousands of Cherokee from their homes east of the Mississippi River. Many died on the long journey to their new home in Oklahoma, but around a thousand people escaped and remained in the mountains of North Carolina and Tennessee. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Miller and His Mill

A man named Samuel Pearson built a three-story structure called a gristmill in North Carolina’s Piedmont in the 1750s. Yates Mill, as it is known today, still stands in this original location near downtown Raleigh. The mill tells an important story about colonial life and the colonial economy.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A New Deal for the American People

This article provides a basic overview of the events and reform programs that characterized the Great Depression. This article originally appeared in the Spring 1985 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A New Government Allows Reforms

After the mid-1830s, the major parties in antebellum North Carolina became the Whig Party and the Democratic Party. Whigs came into power in North Carolina after the state’s Constitutional Convention of 1835. Whigs favored internal improvements and diversifying the economy while Democrats argued for limited government involvement in most matters. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A New Home

North Carolina has a population of Montagnard from Vietnam that numbers in the thousands. Many Montagnard immigrated to the United States in search of religious and political freedom. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A New Woman Emerges

Along with cropped hair, short skirts, and daring make-up, new political and social rights were sported by women in the 1920s . Learn how women's lives changed dramatically in just a decade. This article appeared in the Spring 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A North Carolina WASP

With a degree in fine arts from Duke University and a private pilot's license, North Carolinian Katherine Lee Harris Adams took to the skies with the Women's Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) during World War II. Test-flying repaired aircraft and transporting planes between bases, Kate Adams proudly served her country. This article appeared in the Fall 2003 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Part of Life, Not Just a Sunday Event: Religious Life in Antebellum North Carolina

During the antebellum era, protestant Christianity was central to the lives of North Carolinians. The church functioned as a social organization and as a tool to enforce discipline amongst community members. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A School by Any Other Name

A name can become a living link to someone or something from our time or another time. Chances are your school is named for a person, place, or idea. Learn about how schools are named in North Carolina. This article appeared in the Spring 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Shadow over Progress: 1850-1861

By the 1850s, North Carolina could boast improvements in both its educational and transportation system. However, the debate over slavery cast a shadow over North Carolina’s progress. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Snapshot in Time: How to Study a Photo

Photographs from the past can teach us about people and events. This article uses a picture from the NC State Archives to demonstrate the process of analyzing a photo. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Soldier's Life

This article provides a fictional account (but based on diaries, letters, and journals written by soldiers) of the daily life of a Confederate soldier. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Story about Story

Storytelling is an art form used for everthing from telling someone about your day to explaining why buzzards are bald. This article appeared in the Spring 2002 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Thanksgiving Day Disaster

On a Thanksgiving day in 1892 the Hotel Zinzendorf in Winston, NC erupted into fire. The reason for the fire was never determined and the hotel was not rebuilt. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

A Wagon with a Story to Tell

Abigail and Joshua Stanley lived in the Centre Community of southern Guilford County where their home served as a stop on the Underground Railroad. They also owned a wagon with a secret compartment. Legend says that the wagon was used to ferry African Americans to free states during the mid 1800s. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Activities

Activity utilizing the map published in John Lawson's A New Voyage to Carolina, published in 1709. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

African American Brilliance

Do you ever wonder what you would do without a toilet-tissue holder or turn signals on cars? African American North Carolinians have invented countless inventions that make our lives easier. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

African American Civil Rights in North Carolina

Explore how African Americans in North Carolina fought for civil rights from the antebellum period through the mid-1960s. This article appeared in the Fall 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

African American Culture and the World Around You

African American culture continues to influence North Carolina today through food and cooking, arts and crafts, and music and dance traditions. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 28 January 2009.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

African American Political Pioneers

Thirteen African American men served as delegates to North Carolina’s 1868 Constitutional Convention. This article gives a brief biography of each man and outlines some of the general achievements of the convention. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

African Americans in Union-Occupied Eastern North Carolina during the Civil War

The Union occupation of eastern North Carolina offered the opportunity for many African Americans to escape slavery. Some of these freedmen served as soldiers or as support personnel for the Union forces. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2000 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

African and African American Storytelling

Slavery led to changes in the tradition of African American storytelling. Learn how tales that once featured the lion, elephant, and hyena began to star the rabbit, fox, and bear. This article appeared in the Spring 2002 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Agriculture at the State Fair

At the heart of North Carolina's economy and culture lie its rich agricultural resources. Learn how the North Carolina State Fair evolved as a way for North Carolinians to share new technology and to show the rest of the country "the variety and magnificence of the products and resources of North Carolina." This article appeared in the Fall 2002 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

America's Music in the 1920s

Before there were CDs and MP3 players, people listened to the radio and phonograph records and heard live music. Explore the music styles that entertained North Carolina audiences in the twenties. This article appeared in the Spring 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

American Indian Storytelling

American Indian storytellers relate lively tales that help preserve the precious cultural heritage of their communities. This article appeared in the Spring 2002 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

American Indians and the Civil War

Did you know that Native Americans were involved in the Civil War? For North Carolina’s American Indians, as for many other Southerners, the Civil War was a time of bravery, starvation, hiding, and uncertainty. The situation was different for each tribe. Some tribes fought for the Confederacy, and others stuck with the Union. But no matter which side they took, the Indian communities paid a price as America fought its Civil War. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2000 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

American Tobacco Trail

In Durham, Chatham, and Wake counties, an old railroad track is being made into a new paved nature trail. Find out more about the American Tobacco Trail.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

An Interview with Chief Justice Henry Frye

Henry Frye made a significant mark on North Carolina history on September 7, 1999, when he took the oath of office as the first African American chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court. This article appeared in the Spring 2000 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Analyzing an Artifact: What in the World is a Hogshead?

When you visit a historic site or a museum you may encounter artifacts that you can’t readily identify. In this article, the assistant site manager at Duke Homestead Historic Site discusses one such artifact in that site’s possession, a large hogshead (which was a type of barrel generally used to store tobacco). This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

And the Mysterious Mr. Ney

North Carolina history is full of stories that have not made it into traditional history textbooks. One of these tales is of the mysterious Mr. Ney who arrived in North Carolina in 1816. Rumors persist to this day that Peter Stuart Ney was in reality Marshal Michel Ney, one of Napoleon’s military commanders who was supposedly executed in 1815. This article examines the myths and the facts surrounding the mysterious Mr. Ney’s life. This article appeared in the Fall 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Antebellum Life on an Edgecombe County Farm

A small farmhouse in Edgecombe county, owned by Silas and Rebecca Everett, demonstrates life in North Carolina for the antebellum farmer. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Antebellum Settlers in the Mountain Region

The Zebulon B. Vance Birthplace State Historic Site tells the story of the people who settled in western North Carolina during the early antebellum era. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Appalachian Trail

Running through 12 states, the Appalachian Trail is a favorite of hikers from Georgia to Maine. Find out what you might encounter on the North Carolina section of the trail.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Archibald DeBow Murphey: Leader of a Growing State Envisioning Change

Archibald Murphey served in the North Carolina Senate in the early 1800s. He also established a reputation as a reformer who favored public education and internal improvements. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Arrivals in the East: Settlement of the Coastal Plain, 1650 to 1775

Read how the Coastal Plain of North Carolina was settled. Learn who immigrated to North Carolina and what conditions discouraged immigration. This article appeared in the Spring 1995 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Assigned Places

What did Jim Crow laws mean for North Carolina's African Americans? Read how segregation visibly affected daily life in the Tar Heel State. This article appeared in the Spring 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Aviation in North Carolina, 1873-2003

Investigate state's aviation history and learn how North Carolina earned the motto First in Flight. This article appeared in the Fall 2003 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Babe Ruth

Before he became a baseball legend, Babe Ruth gained fame in Fayetteville, Cumberland County, where he earned his nickname and hit his first home run. This article was appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 20 February 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Barbecue: Still Smoking after Three Hundred Years

North Carolina has developed its own type of smoked pork barbeque. Barbeque can trace its roots back to at least the colonial era and is still a major food presence in North Carolina today. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Baseball Outlaws during the Depression

The Carolina League developed from the semiprofessional baseball teams that textile mills fielded throughout the 1920s. The league attracted a flock of talented players by offering stability and steady paychecks during the tough times of the Great Depression. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Bath: North Carolina’s First Town

As the population of the Virginia colony grew, people began to move south into present-day North Carolina. In 1705 the town of Bath was incorporated as the first town in the colony. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Becoming North Carolina

During the 1700s eastern North Carolina shared one government but seemed more like a patchwork of isolated regions. The early colony was dominated by the Albemarle and the Lower Cape Fear, but it included areas in between, too. Different religious and ethnic groups lived in all of these areas as well, further complicating matters. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Bellamy and the Height of Antebellum Design

The Bellamy Mansion in Wilmington, North Carolina, provides a snapshot of how wealthy antebellum Tar Heels lived prior to the Civil War. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Blimps Over Elizabeth City

The U.S. government used blimps during WWII in order to protect its ships and harbors. Prior to the start of WWII, only one blimp station existed in the United States. However, with the mounting tensions in Europe, the U.S. government decided to establish several blimp stations along the U.S. coast. One such blimp station was the Weeksville Naval Air Station which was built outside of Elizabeth City, N.C. Blimps from Weeksville worked throughout WWII as ship escorts and participated in search and rescue work. After the war, the station passed through several different owners and is today owned by TCOM, a subsidiary of Westinghouse Electric, where it continues to house blimps. This article appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Breakfast with the President

George Washington visited North Carolina when he was president. The foods prepared for the president, as well as the activities he participated while visiting North Carolina, gives us the chance to learn about life in North Carolina in the late 1700s. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Brothers in Bondage: The Moravians Struggle with the Institution of Slavery

Historical record shows that Moravians (Protestant dissenters) in Salem, North Carolina, owned enslaved African Americans during the colonial era. These records reveal the awkward, and sometimes tense, relationshiops that resulted from the practice of slavery in a community that prided itself on Christian love and unity. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Caleb Bradham and the Invention of Pepsi-Cola

Caleb Bradham opened a drugstore in New Bern. There he developed a popular beverage that his customers called "Brad's drink," which he later renamed Pepsi-Cola. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Caleb Davis Bradham

Who would have ever thought that when Caleb Davis Bradham served up a delicious carbonated soda at his drugstore in New Bern, Craven County, the drink would soon become one of the world's favorite beverages, Pepsi-Cola? This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 23 April 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Carbine Williams

Sometimes great inventions start in strange places. Learn how Carbine Williams developed the M-1 carbine rifle used by the U.S. military in World War II. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 26 March 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Celebrating Thousands of Years in a Single Day

The goal of the 10th annual American Indian Heritage Celebration, held at the North Carolina Museum of History, was to build awareness of American Indian heritage and culture. Demonstrations of traditional crafts were held, a traditional longhouse was built on the grounds of the State Capitol, and other activities and events took place. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Challenging the Chain Stores

In 1929 a new cooperative business group called the Colored Merchants Association (CMA) formed in Winston-Salem. This group’s goal was to preserve independently owned African American grocery stores who were losing business to chain stores. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Charlotte Hawkins Brown: Legendary Educator

A true legend in her time, Charlotte Hawkins Brown was not only a great educator but also a civil rights advocate. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 6 February 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Charlotte Hawkins Brown: The Evolution of a North Carolina Legacy

Read about the accomplishments of African American educator Charlotte Hawkins Brown, who founded a school for African American children in the early 1900s in North Carolina. This article appeared in the Spring 2000 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Cherokee Basketry

There are four main stages to making a basket in the Cherokee tradition. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Cherokee Life Just Before Removal

This article examines Cherokee life in western North Carolina during the antebellum era before Indian removal by the U.S. government (also known as the Trail of Tears) as well as life after the removal. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Children during the Civil War

Although their experiences varied according to geography, gender, and race, all children were affected by the Civil War in one way or another. This article examines how the Civil War affected children. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2000 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Chinese Folktales

What happens when the lazy farmer finds a rabbit? Find out how Chinese folktales have taught history and values throughout time. This article appeared in the Spring 2002 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Civil War Amputations

During the Civil War many surgeons performed amputations and many of those soldiers who had lost an arm or a leg during the war wanted an artificial limb. North Carolina became the first former Confederate state to offer artificial limbs to amputees. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Collecting Nature: The Beginning of the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences

The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences opened in 1879. Two brothers from England, Herbert Hutchinson Brimley and Clement Samuel Brimley, became leaders of the museum. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

College Basketball Pioneers in North Carolina

Today North Carolina enjoys a top reputation when it comes to men’s college basketball teams. However, this was not the case until two different coaches—John McLendon and Everett Case came to North Carolina in the 1940s to coach basketball. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Communities of Faith: American Indian Churches in Eastern North Carolina

In North Carolina, following the Civil War, the government passed laws segregating public facilities by race. Restrooms, theaters, and schools were divided for “white” and “colored” people, but American Indians did not consider themselves “colored,” a term used to mean African American. Many American Indians formed their own churches to separate and preserve their distinct racial and cultural identity. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Contemporary Migration in North Carolina

Until the mid-1990s, more people migrated out of than into the state. Between 1980 and 1990, North Carolina had a net in-migration of 374,954 people. Find out what has caused this population tilt, or reversal of past trends. This article appeared in the Spring 1995 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

County Court Week in Antebellum North Carolina

During the antebellum era in North Carolina many counties erected ornate courthouses. The documents produced by the courts (such as bonds, deeds, wills, etc.) provide historians with important information about antebellum life. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Courage above and beyond the Call of Duty: Tar Heels in World War II

Many North Carolinians performed heoric feats of bravery during World War II. Learn about some of these men such as Major George Preddy Jr., Jacklyn "Jack" Lucus, and Commander Norman M. Miller who were honored by the military for their courageous actions during the war. This article first appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Creating a Cultural Connection

Hundreds of thousands of Latin American migrants have settled in North Carolina in the last twenty years. Life many earlier waves of people arriving from other countries, they have brought their traditions with them. One of these traditions involves honoring the Virgen de Guadalupe (the Virgin Mary) through dance on December 12. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Dancing through History with the Warriors of AniKituhwa

The modern Warriors of AniKituhwa perform traditional Cherokee dance at community events. Their dance is modeled on historical research and is meant to preserve cultural traditions in an ever-changing world. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Daniel Boone: Trailblazer

Before blazing a trail through the wildnerness to Kentucky, Daniel Boone was a North Carolina hunter who didn't actually wear a coonskin cap! This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 13 February 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

David "Carbine" Williams and the Invention of the M1 Carbine

David Marshall Williams, of Cumberland County, developed a short-stroke gas piston. His invention became an important part of the Carbine Caliber .30 M1, the military rifle of World War II. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

David Settle Reid: Champion for "The Common People"

In 1850, David Settle Reid was the first Democrat to be elected governor of North Carolina. Reid was a proponent of free manhood suffrage (the idea that all white men, regardless of if they owned property, should be free to vote for their elected officials). This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Difficult Days on Tar Heel Farms

Even prior to the Great Depression North Carolina farmers struggled to make a living. Throughout the 1930s, due to soil exhaustion, falling crop prices, and farm mechanization (which reduced the need for sharecroppers and tenant farmers) the plight of the North Carolina farmer worsened. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Dig in to North Carolina's Food History

Part of what makes North Carolina distinct is the types of foods its inhabitants enjoy. Some of these food traditions date back to the first inhabitants of the region—the American Indians, while others are more recent due to new immigrants to the state. However long certain food traditions have been in place, they help the historian to understand the culture and lifeways of North Carolina’s peoples. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Digging Deep: Primary Sources in Archaeology

Archaeologists study the past by examining the material remains of previous people in order to determine how people from the past lived. This article gives an overview of the different people archaeologists study and how they go about unearthing artifacts. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Discovering What Native North Carolinians Ate

Archaeologists learn about the diet of American Indians who lived in North Carolina prior to European contact by studying the plant and animal remains present at archaeological sites. From these remains, archaeologists have been able to deduce some of the foods the first North Carolinians ate. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Doc Watson--North Carolina Legend

Native North Carolinian, Arthel “Doc” Watson, has been amazing audiences for decades with his guitar playing. Watson is one of North Carolina’s most noted and award-winning musicians. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Dogwood, Longleaf Pine, Plott Hound, Channel Bass, Gray Squirrel and Stock Car Racing?

Describes why stock car racing is North Carolina’s official state sport. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Dorton Arena

The North Carolina State Fairgrounds boasts a technological and historic landmark. With a roof fully supported by cables, Dorton Arena is an impressive sight! This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 14 May 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Dotting the Map with the North Carolina Gazetteer

Read about the creation of the North Carolina Gazetteer , a book filled with listings for more than 20,000 places and geographic features in North Carolina. This article appeared in the Spring 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Dressed for Success: Uniforms and Women's Athletics

Over the past 100 years or so, women’s basketball uniforms have changed constantly. What women and girls have worn has often seemed as meaningful as how they played. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Earliest American Explorers: Adventures and Survival

The New World "discovered" by Europeans was actually settled much earlier by American Indians who--based on archaeological evidence--may have been on the continent for fifty thousand years. European contact brought major changes to Indian life--devastating diseases, culture shifts, and even slavery--but despite it all, Indian culture adapted and survives today. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 issue of Tarl Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Early Black Baseball in North Carolina

Years before the establishment of natinoal baseball leagues for black competitors in the 1920s, African American men were playing baseball all over North Carolina. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

East against West: The Fight over Internal Improvements

During the antebellum period in North Carolina, debate surrounded over the implementation of a series of internal improvements aimed at upgrading transportation around the state. Generally, the eastern counties, fearing higher taxes, did not support these initiatives while the western counties did support internal improvements. The western counties supported internal improvements because these counties wanted more railroads, roads, and canals so that their agricultural products could get to market more easily. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Elisha Mitchell and His Mountain

Elisha Mitchell proved that a mountain in the Black Mountains Range in western North Carolina is the highest peak in the eastern United States. After his death in 1837, that mountain was named after him. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Enemies and Friends: POWs in the Tar Heel State

During WWII, Prisoner of War (POW) camps existed not only in Europe and Asia, but the United States as well. Robert D. Billinger Jr. examines several POW camps that existed in North Carolina during the second world war. Many of the camps inhabitants (mostly Italians and Germans) performed agricultural labor for local farmers, and generally reported that they had a positive experience while in the state. This article appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Escape Through the Great Dismal Swamp

A land of opportunity awaited Virginia's freed or escaped indentured servants and Quakers in Carolina--just beyond the 2200 square-acre Great Dismal Swamp. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Excavating Joara and Fort San Juan

Archaeologists discovered the remains of the American Indian town of Joara in 1986. American Indian and Spanish artifacts, including the remains of five burned buildings thought to have housed Fort San Juan and its soldiers, are located on twelve acres in Burke County. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Expanding to the West: Settlement of the Piedmont Region, 1730 to 1775

Discover how North Carolina's backcountry was settled. Who used the Great Indian Trading Path and the Great Wagon Road? Examine immigrants to the backcountry and learn their reasons for migrating to that area. This article appeared in the Spring 1995 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Explorers Are You: Tar Heel Junior Historians, Pigs, and Sir Walter Raleigh

Like Christopher Columbus, Hernando de Soto, Juan Pardo, and Sir Walter Raleigh, Tar Heel Junior Historians are explorers. Early explorers influenced life in North Carolina as countries like Spain and England sought to increase in both power and wealth. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Facts and Fiction: Looking for the Colonists

While stories abound about the possible fate of the 1587 Lost Colonists, little archaeological evidence remains to definitively reveal what happened. And why did colonies at Roanoke Island fail so quickly, when others such as Jamestown did not? This article appeared in the Fall 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Farm and Factory Struggles

The 1920s brought prosperity for some people, but for North Carolina's farmers, sharecroppers, and mill workers, this roaring decade brought more hardship. This article appeared in the Spring 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Fast Facts about American Indians

Did you know that American Indians introduced pumpkins, chili, and squash to Europeans? This is just one fast fact included in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Finding a Lost Fort (North Carolina's Real First Colony)

According to archaeological and written evidence, Spain, not England, established the first European settlement in North Carolina. In 1567 the native town of Joara became the site of Captain Juan Pardo's Fort San Juan. American Indians burned the fort in May 1568. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

First Immigrants: Native American Settlement of North Carolina

Discover what archaeologists have learned about the origins and everyday lives of American Indians in North Carolina. Find out how European settlement pushed Indians westward, sparking conflicts. This article appeared in the Spring 1995 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Flight of the Imagination

Some inventors in North Carolina decided that flying was not just for the birds. Read about Igor Bensen and Francis Rogallo, who developed their own flying machines: the gyrocopter and the hang glider. This article appeared in the Fall 2003 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Flora MacDonald: "The Bright and Particular Star"

Flora MacDonald lived in North Carolina only a short time, but her legend took strong hold within the Scottish population. Find out why it continues today and spans two continents. This article appeared in the Spring 2000 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Flying the Unfriendly Skies: North Carolinians in the Two World Wars

Read about the lives and adventures of North Carolina's many heroic military aviators. From the bombardier on the Enola Gay to the first American to shoot down a German plane in World War I, North Carolinians took to the unfriendly skies to serve their country. This article appeared in the Fall 2003 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historianmagazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Food Fondly Remembered

Evelyn Ruth Ragan wrote this short essay about her food-related memoires growing up in the 1950s and 1960s at the home of her parents near New Hill, North Carolina. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Food and Faith

This article examines how food plays some role in religious life for most faith communities. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Footsteps of Change with VISTA

Alice Eley Jones reflects on her experiences as an African American growing up in segregated North Carolina and recalls how she joined the grassroots fight for civil rights. This article appeared in the Fall 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Fort Fisher

During the Civil War, Fort Fisher grew to be the largest and strongest earthwork fort in the world. The fort fell to Union forces after a devastating battle in 1865. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2000 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Frnaklin D. Roosevelt and the Great Depression

Franklin D. Roosevelt is considered one of the best presidents in United States history by many historians. This article explains why many historians consider him such a remarkable president by examining what the country was like when he took office and the programs he implemented to combat the results of the Great Depression. This article originally appeared in the Spring 1985 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

From Caledonia to Carolina: The Highland Scots

Many Scots immigrated to North Carolina due to growing population, changing methods of farming, and the defeat of the Highland Scots by English and Scottish forces in 1746. The first organized settlement of Highland Scots was in Cumberland County, where 350 people moved to in 1739. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

From Hep Cats to Full Birds: Sland of the 1940s

During World War II new slang was created that incorporated many of the terms that were associated with the war and military life. This article appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

From Teletypes to the Internet: Sports and the Media

Advances in technology, such as the teletypes, television, and the internet have allowed more people to follow sports teams without necessarily attending the games. This has had both positive and negative reprocussions on the sport’s world. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Furniture Making in North Carolina

North Carolina is known worldwide for the furniture it makes. More people buy furniture made in North Carolina than in any other place on earth. The honor of “furniture capital of the world” is a development of the twentieth century, though it had its beginnings in the late 1800s. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1999 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

George Higgs and the Bull City Blues

One particular style of music, known as the blues, experienced great popularity in Durham in the 1930s. Many blues musicians became well known in Durham in the 1930s and achieved national influence during the folk and blues revivals that began during the 1960s. One musician who was inspired by these blues singers and players was George Higgs. Higg’s musical career and the history of blues in North Carolina is recounted in this article. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

George Preddy: Greensboro's Ace

George Preddy was the Tar Heel State's top World War II ace. Find out how he earned his aviation honors. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 17 October 2003.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Get Out of Your Seat and Up on that Stage

Starting in the 1920s a burst of playwriting and acting started in Chapel Hill and moved across the state. These plays were referred to as folk plays and centered on the lives of ordinary North Carolina folk. The leader of this movement was Frederick Koch who was a professor at UNC. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Good Eats!

The American Indians encountered by Europeans in the 1500s consumed a varied diet that included corn, beans, squash, sweeet potatoes, pumpkins, peppers, peanuts, berries, seeds, and meat from animals in the wild. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 19 November 2008.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Hanged for Murder, but Was She Guilty?

On July 12, 1833 Francis “Frankie” Silver was hung for her husband’s murder in western North Carolina. However, there were no witnesses to the crime, the defendant was not allowed to testify on her behalf, and the jurors changed their verdict. Over 150 years later many wonder if Frankie was truly guilty of killing her husband. This article appeared in the Fall 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Hard Lessons from Hard Times

This article serves as the introduction to the spring 2010 THJHA Magazine about the Great Depression. The author discusses the differences between North Carolina in the 1930s and North Carolina in 2010. Links to online resources about the Great Depression are provided and the author addresses the importance of using oral histories of this era in order to determine how people felt and lived during the Great Depression. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Hardship and Heartbreak: Surviving the War at Home

With many able-bodied southern men serving in the Confederate Army, the job of providing for the family fell largely on the shoulders of women. As the war dragged on, the strain of being the sole provider for the welfare of the family caused much angst for those women. The experience of one such family, the Armsworthys, is recounted. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2000 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Having "My Pikter Taken": Photographic Memories of the Civil War

Photography became more widespread during the 1860s and many soldiers flocked to photographers to have their pictures taken. As a result, the Civil War is one of the first American conflicts we have photographic records of. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Help From the Home Front: Women's Clubs Contribute to the Cause

While many American men were fighting in Europe and the Pacific during WWII, American women contributed to the war effort in a variety of ways at home. Women’s clubs raised money, namely through bond sales, that financed the purchase of planes, ships, and bombers. They also sponsored programs that contributed to national defense, volunteered in the Red Cross, and implemented programs designed to improve morale. One particular women’s club, the General Federation of Women’s Clubs of North Carolina, ranked fourth in overall bond sales in the United States. This article appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Helping the Wright Brothers: Friends on the Outer Banks

Orville and Wilbur Wright didn't go it alone at Kitty Hawk. These two aviation pioneers received crucial assistance from the residents of the Outer Banks! This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 21 November 2003.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Henry Berry Lowry Lives Forever

Henry Berry Lowry was a legend in Robeson County even before he vanished in February 1872. Learn how Lowry became known as a modern-day Robin Hood among the Lumbee. This article appeared in the Spring 2000 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Historian's Tools: Primary and Secondary Sources

Historians learn about the past by studying both primary and secondary sources. This article explains what primary sources are and how historians use them to learn about the past. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Historians Piece It All Together

Historians use all kinds of documents, including wills, to learn about the past. This article demonstrates how research on one particular will leads to greater knowledge about one colonial North Carolina family. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Historical Hound

The Plott hound is the only officially recognized breed of dog developed in North Carolina and in 1989 became the state dog of N.C. This article outlines the history of the Plott hound in N.C. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

History Echoes Through Oakdale, Wilmington’s Picturesque Rural Cemetery

In 1852 Wilmington, NC leaders got a charter from the state for 65 acres of land east of the then town limits. This area became Oakdale Cemetery. This cemetery is a fine example of one built during the rural cemetery movement that swept the nation starting in the mid nineteenth century. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Homegrown Skills: Creating a Way of Life at the Coast

Changes in technology, transportation, and population have changed the way the coastal inhabitants of North Carolina live as compared to past coastal residents. Two traditional coastal crafts--decoy making and boat building are described. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Hospital Cars Rode the Rails

During World War II, the U.S. Army had a series of railroad passenger cars built to carry wounded soldiers from hospital ships to military hospitals across the United States. However the history of the hospital car can be traced back to the Civil War. These cars were in use through the Korean War, after which they were surplused and sold off. The NC Transportation Museum has one of the hospital cars on display at its museum. This article appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

How Did We Get Here from There? Advances in North Carolina Transportation

The earliest European immigrants to North Carolina arrived by boat and often traveled inland by Conestoga wagon. Since that time, transportation improvements have included roads, railroads, automobiles, and airplanes. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

How Did Yellow Fever Infect Wilmington in 1862?

In this article primary sources, such as newspapers, are used to investigate the mystery of how yellow fever spread to Wilmington in 1862—41 years since the last outbreak! This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

How the Twenties Roared in North Carolina

A decade of mixed fortunes, the 1920s left no one unaffected by economic, social, and political changes. This article appeared in the Spring 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Hurricane Warning! The Storm of 1752

How do historians learn about hurricanes that affected North Carolina before the advent of modern technology like the internet and television? They study primary sources like county and state records as well as maps in order to reconstruct when and where hurricanes have occurred as well as their affect on the state. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Indian Cabinetmakers in Piedmont North Carolina

The Jeffreys family, American Indians in Orange County, built furniture in the early part of the 19th century. It is possible that members of the family worked with well-known African American cabinetmaker Thomas Day for a short time in Hillsborough. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Inside the Contemporary Powwow

Dancing, drumming, ceremonies, and the selling of traditional crafts are all a part of the modern powwow. Today powwows are a means of affirming and exchanging cultures and traditions among American Indians. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Inventions in the Tobacco Industry

After the Civil War, Durham and Winston-Salem became major centers of tobacco manufacturing. Many different inventions helped facilitate the manufacturing process in this growing, competitive industry. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Inventions of the Air

In North Carolina, the Wright brothers were not the only inventors of flying machines. Igor Bensen developed the gyrocopter as a "people's flying machine" and Francis M. Rogallo and his wife Gertrude made a prototype hang glider from a kitchen curtain. Learn more about these two inventions. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 7 May 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

It Needed to Change Before the State Could Grow: North Carolina's Constitutional Convention of 1835

Legislators during the antebellum era in North Carolina felt that the state’s original constitution, written in 1776, needed to be amended to reflect changes in population and geographic distribution. Thus, the Constitutional Convention of 1835 was adjourned in order to institute new policies in terms of representation, elections, and voting rights. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Jane S. McKimmon and the Greening of North Carolina

Jane McKimmon was a pioneer--in what was a new career for women in the early 1900s—home economics. McKimmon preached the importance of a healthy lifestyle including well-rounded meals that featured vegetables grown at home. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Jim Thorpe and Babe Ruth: Sports Legends

If you are a sports fan, you have probably heard the names Jim Thorpe and Babe Ruth. Both men are considered among the greatest athletes of all time, and both played sports in North Carolina early in their careers. Read this THJH article to learn more! This article appeared in the Spring 2000 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Jim Thorpe

Before becoming an Olympic gold medalist, Jim Thorpe began his sports career in minor league baseball in North Carolina. Little did he know that his time in the Tar Heel State would cost him his Olympic medals. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer , 12 March 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

John Blue, Inventor

John Blue, a Scotland County native, made items in the family's blacksmith shop. Blue went on to design machines that made cotton farming easier. The article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

John Lawson's North Carolina

Growing up in England, John Lawson heard tales from family and friends about strange lands, people, animals, and goods. At twenty-five, he boarded a ship to the New World and began his own adventures as a surveyor, natural history collector, botanist, author, and explorer. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Just One Lady--How Dorothea Dix Fought for One Antebellum Social Reform

Despite social restraints on the role of women as outspoken reformers, Dorothea Dix rallied across the country in the mid nineteenth century to improve the housing conditions of the insane. She was pivotal in establishing just such a hospital in North Carolina in 1849 which eventually became known as Dorothea Dix Hospital. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Just Say No--to Tea! The Edenton Tea Party

Convinced the Tea Act of 1773 was unfair, and inspired by the Boston Tea Party, fifty-one Edenton women pledge not to purchase tea from the East India Company. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 24 September 2008.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Keeping the School Doors Open

Unlike other states, North Carolina did not close down its public schools during the Great Depression although the Depression did affect the educational system. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Kiffin Rockwell: Fearless Pilot of World War I

Read about Kiffin Rockwell, the most famous North Carolina aviator of World War I. Initially a volunteer in the French Foreign Legion, Rockwell joined the Lafayette Escadrille and became adept at aerial combat. He died a hero while trying to shoot down a German plane in September 1916. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 5 December 2003.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Language Tells North Carolina History

Did you know that North Carolinians speak many different dialects? People living in different areas of the state often speak dialects with distinct words and phrases that reflect their cultural heritage. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Laying the Foundation: American Indian Education in North Carolina

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke opened as the Croatan Normal School in 1887 for the education of American Indians in Robeson County. When schools in the state were desegregated, Indians often lost community schools that served as community centers. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Learning the "Live-at-Home" Lesson

On December 4, 1929 North Carolina Governor O. Max Gardner unveiled his “Live-at-Home” program. Under this plan, he proposed that farmers replace some of the tobacco and cotton they planted with food like beans, corn, wheat, and tomatoes so that North Carolinians would have more healthy food to eat. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Legend: Blackbeard

The legendary pirate Blackbeard prowled the coastal waters of North Carolina, but what do we really know about this treacherous plunderer of the seas? This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 30 January 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Legend: Dolley Madison

Though her name has been used in advertising for years, she's not just the namesake of a snack cake. Sort fact from fiction in the life of North Carolina-born first lady Dolley Madison. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 23 January 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Legend: Sequoyah, Inventor of the Cherokee Alphabet

Not all alphabets start with ABC. Learn how Sequoyah developed the Cherokee alphabet in the 19th century so that his people could read and write their own language. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer , 16 January 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Legend: Virginia Dare

Whatever happened to Virginia Dare? Learn the legend of her transformation into a ghostly white doe who still haunts the site of the Lost Colony. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 9 January 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Legendary Women

North Carolina’s women played an active role in the Revolutionary War—both as loyalists and patriots. The stories of the following women are highlighted: Flora MacDonald, Mary Dowd, Elizabeth Cornell Bayard, Margaret Sharpe Gaston, Betsy Dowdy, Mary Slocumb, Elizabeth Maxwell Steele, and Hannah Blair. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1992 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Legends and Myths: The "Three Sisters"

The tail of the "Three Sisters" is told in many different ways by American Indians. In each story the sisters represent the three foods needed to sustain life: corn, squash, and beans. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Lest We Forget: Women Inventors

North Carolina boasts a number of women inventors. Abigail Carter patented overalls, and Beulah Louise Henry patented a vacuum-sealed ice cream freezer. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Life on the Plantation at Stagville

Stagville was one of the largest plantations in antebellum North Carolina. The history of the plantation, as well as its enslaved population, is described in this article. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Lindbergh's Influence on Aviation

Aviator Charles Lindbergh sparked the growth of the airline industry in North Carolina with his 1927 visit to Greensboro and Winston-Salem. From the building of Lindley Field (now Piedmont Triad International Airport) to the childhood dreams of the Memphis Belle's pilot, explore Lindbergh's widespread influence in North Carolina aviation. This article appeared in the Fall 2003 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Longtime Chief of the Waccamaw-Siouan: Priscilla Freeman Jacobs

Priscilla Freeman Jacobs became the first female chief of the Waccamaw-Siouan tribe in the 20th century. She led the tribe from 1986 to 2005, when the chief position became an elected position for the first time. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Looking at North Carolina through a Lens of Words

North Carolina is lucky to have a very rich heritage of literature. The following North Carolina authors are discussed in this article: George Moses Horton, Thomas Wolfe, Wilma Dykeman, Suzanne Newton, Guy Owen, Barbara Presnell, Lenard Moore, and Fred Chappell. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Love May Lead to Freedom, but It Usually Takes a First Few Steps: The Story of the 1960 Greensboro Sit-Ins

Discover how four young African American men from North Carolina began one of the most influential demonstrations of the Civil Rights movement by sitting down at a Woolworth's lunch counter on February 1, 1960. This article appeared in the Fall 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Lunsford Richardson

Have you ever wondered who came up with the idea of Vicks VapoRub? North Carolinian Lunsford Richardson developed this innovative treatment for colds and flu in the 19th century. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 21 May 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Making Maps

Cartography has evolved from basic charts and maps to--as science and math progressed--accurate depictions of geographical areas and features. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Mammoth Moving Pictures

Before the advent of the modern movie theater, Charlotte resident Arthur L. Butt created a special type of show called a panorama. Popular in the 1800s, panoramas were literally moving picture shows. Butt and his giant roll of paintings traveled the country for much of the nineteenth century. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Marks on the Land We Can See: Routes of Carolina's Earliest Explorers

American Indian Pathways formed an extensive network that connected communities across the country. European soldiers and settlers, traders, debtors, escaped indentured servants and slaves, and raiding parties used these paths. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Mary Nicholson: Pioneering Aviator

Amelia Earhart was not the only female aviator of her time. Learn about North Carolinian Mary Nicholson, who died while ferrying military planes in Britain in World War II. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 14 November 2003.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Master of Round Peak Music

Thomas Jefferson Jarrell (1901-1985) lived in a community called Round Peak in Surry County, NC. He became a well-known musician who contributed to Round Peak Music—a musical tradition in which the songs tell of everyday life. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Me and the Jack Tales

Have you ever heard of Jack and the Beanstalk? Jack the Giant Killer? Orville Hicks talks about Jack tales and then tells his favorite. This article appeared in the Spring 2002 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Mining for Mystery in the Uwharries

The article discusses the Russell Mine which was one of the largest gold mines in the Uwharries (located in south central North Carolina). This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Money Trouble

The Civil War affected every aspect of life in the South, right down to the money in people’s pockets. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Moving through History

Immigration and migration have always affected the people of North Carolina. The earliest American Indians likely emigrated 15,000 years ago from Asia. Europeans immigrated to North Carolina beginning in the 1500s. Africans underwent a forced migration as slave laborers, and some Cherokee were forced to immigrate to Oklahoma by the federal government. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Nancy Ward: "War Woman" of the Cherokee

Read the fascinating true story of a Cherokee woman who sought to make peace between American Indians and settlers. Learn how she won the right to speak in council meetings and to decide the fate of prisoners. This article appeared in the Spring 1994 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Nat Turner's Revolt in Virginia Raises Concerns in Neighboring North Carolina

Nat Turner led a slave uprising in Virginia in 1831 in which approximately sixty whites were killed. This revolt contributed to white fear of slave revolt throughout the south including North Carolina. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Nathaniel Macon: Leader of an Agrian State Resisting Change

Nathaniel Macon was a North Carolina politician during the late 1700s and early 1800s. He was known for his conservative views—especially his support of state’s rights, and his opposition to internal improvements. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina Civil War Flags

North Carolina’s Confederate troops carried and fought under four different kinds of flags: state flags, company flags, national flags, and battle flags. Today, these banners have become artifacts that help tell the story of the Civil War and those who fought it. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina Gets in the Game

A brief overview of the development of organized sports in North Carolina is outlined. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina Society in 1953 and in 2003

What was North Carolina like long before the Atlantic Coast Conference, cell phones, and cable television? Examine life in the Tar Heel State in the 1950s. This article appeared in the Spring 2003 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina Stories and Storytellers

What does it take to be a great storyteller? Find out from some of the country's best storytellers right here in North Carolina. This article appeared in the Spring 2002 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina and the Birth of Radio Broadcasting

Radio pioneer Reginald Aubrey Fessenden was living on the Outer Banks of North Carolina in 1901 when he conceived of the "high-frequency alternator." Modern electronic communication is based on his invention. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina and the Korean War

The Korean War has been called the "forgotten war." The conflict took place early in the cold war period. North Carolina bases and military personnel once again played important wartime roles.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina: A Culinary Crossroads

Many of the foods we may think of as being native to North Carolina--such as rice, okra, and peaches—are actually from other countries and were brought to the state by explorers and early settlers. This article examines the history of some of the foods that we think of as being uniquely North Carolinian. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina's Final Frontier: Settlement of the Mountain Region, 1775 to 1838

Who immigrated to the unforgiving Mountain region of North Carolina? How did settlers in this isolated region travel and trade? Read this THJH article to find out! This article appeared in the Spring 1995 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina's Founding Fathers

Who were North Carolina’s founding fathers? A brief biography of the three men who represented North Carolina at the Continental Congress is given (Joseph Hewes, William Hooper, and John Penn). Also, the three North Carolinians who signed the Constitution are discussed (William Blount, Hugh Williamson, and Richard Dobbs Spaight). This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina's Wartime Miracle: Defending the Nation

The United States' entry into WWII led to a frenzy of military base construction, especially in North Carolina. Learn how this unprecedented wave of building helped to ease North Carolina out of the Great Depression and contribute to Allied victory. This article appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina's Youngest Soldiers: The Junior Reserves

In 1864 the Confederacy passed a law that required 17 year old males to join the army. These 17 year olds were organized into the Junior Reserves and were charged with guarding key military points in their homestate. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina’s American Indians in World War II

American Indians from North Carolina served in World War II in different ways. Men from many tribes enlisted or were drafted into the military, and women grew Victory gardens, bought war bonds, and served as nurses or WASP pilots. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Object Lessons

North Carolina has millions of archaeological artifacts that it stores in various offices around the state. Many of these artifacts came from the work of people like Joffre L. Coe, who discovered artifacts at Morrow Mountain State Park and the Doerschuk site. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Old Hickory/Young Hickory

Born in North Carolina, Andrew Jackson and James Knox Polk became influential politicians and eventually both achieved the office of President. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 15 October 2008.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

On My Way: One Actor's Creative Journey

Actor and playwright Mike Wiley writes about how he takes moments in African American history and turns them into one-actor plays based on documentary sources. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

One Kicker of a Contraption

Tom Haywood of Croatan, NC, and Wilber Herring built a kicking machine in 1937. The purpose of the machine was to deliver a gentle rebuke to anyone who felt like they had done something so dumb that they needed to be punished. Over the years, this roadside attraction became a major stop for travelers until it was donated to the NC Museum of History in the 1990s. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Opening Windows onto Antebellum North Carolina

In this introduction to the Antebellum Places edition of the THJH Magazine the ways historians study the past is examined. A brief overview of North Carolina during the antebellum period is also provided. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Penderlea Yesterday and Today

The agricultural community of Penderlea in Pender County, North Carolina, was the home of a government experiment in constructing communities in Depression-riddled America. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Personal Reflections: Lest I Forget the Civil Rights Movement, the Ligon Jubilee Singers, and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Read about Ann Hunt Smith's moving experience in 1968 as director of the Ligon Jubilee Singers at Ligon High School in Raleigh, Wake County. Smith talks about how the Civil Rights movement and the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. impacted her life and the lives of her students. This article appeared in the Fall 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Phoebe: Spirit of the Past, Light to the Present

Tracing the history of people of color, especially those that were enslaved, prior to 1870 is difficult since few legal documents exist because people of color were not allowed to own property or legally marry. Thus, researchers tracing the history of people of color prior to the end of the Civil War must rely on other documents such as diaries, birth and death records, and baptismal records to shed light on the lives of these people. This article explains how one researcher used primary sources to trace the life of one enslaved woman named Phoebe. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Piedmont Airlines Flies the Blue Skies

Chosen Airline of the Year for 1984 by Air Transport World magazine, Piedmont Airlines began in 1948 with three planes, 250 employees, and the vision of founder Tom Davis. Trace the development of North Carolina's beloved airline from a small operation to a major air carrier offering the first nonstop flight between North Carolina and Europe. This article appeared in the Fall 2003 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Polly Slocumb

Legend has it that Polly Slocumb dreamed that her husband who had gone to fight in the Revolutionary War lay dying on the battlefield at Moores Creek Bridge, so she jumped out of bed and rode to his side. The facts of her life, however, may tell a different story. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 27 February 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Posters Help Win the War at Home

While World War II raged on in Europe and the Pacific, the U.S. government initiated its own assault on the general public in the form of propaganda. Specifically, because they were inexpensive and easy to produce and display, posters became a major medium for promoting patriotism in America during the war. This article examines some of the major themes these posters addressed in relation to the war. This article appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Put Up, Holed in, and Salted Down

This article discusses the various ways people preserved their meat and vegetables prior to refrigerators. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Quaker Abolitionists: The Largest Slaveholders in the State?

During the 1700s and early 1800s an increasing number of Quakers became abolitionists, preaching that owning another person was morally wrong. Many of these Quakers owned slaves and wanted to free them, but Colonial law forbade the manumission of slaves. Thus, North Carolina Quakers spent most of the late 1700s and early 1800s involved in a series of legal battles with the state over the manumission of their slaves. This article appeared in the Fall 1996 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Quaker Out-Migration

In the early 1800s, North Carolina experienced out-migration. The state dropped from third most populous in 1790 to 12th in 1860. One group who left in large numbers was the Quakers, who disagreed with slavery. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Radio Begins

Radio was an invention that swept the nation in the 1920s, bringing news, music, entertainment, and sports into American homes. Explore how radio revolutionized communication within a decade. This article appeared in the Spring 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Recent Population Change in North Carolina

North Carolina has a population growth of 7.88 percent according to the U.S. Census Bureau, and the state has the nation's 11th-highest population. The Hispanic and Asian populations are the two fastest growing. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Rehearsal for Revolution: The North Carolina Regulation

Prior to the American Revolution, a group of North Carolinians known as the Regulators, protested government coruption. Their protest culminated in the Battle of Alamance in 1771 in which forces under Governor Tryon defeated the Regulators. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Remembering Where History Happened: Touring North Carolina's Civil War Sites

This article explores the various historic sites in North Carolina associated with the Civil War. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Remembering the Dead: Civil War Mourning

By the time the Civil War began in 1861, North Carolinians observed the deaths of loved ones by mourning. Mourning practices varied according to gender, economic status, and race but usually involved an outward show of grief. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Rendezvous with History: Thomas W. Ferebee and the Enola Gay

Thomas W. Ferebee started his life as a simple farm boy who grew up outside of Mocksville, North Carolina. However, World War II propelled the high-school athlete to enlist in the Army Air Corps where he distinguished himself as an outstanding bombardier. In 1945, Ferebee served as the bombardier on the Enola Gay, which dropeed the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. This article examines Ferebee's life as well as the controversy surrounding the bombing of Hiroshima.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Rescuing the American Dream

This article discusses the Great Depression’s effects on North Carolina including some of the successes and failures of the New Deal in the Tar Heel state. This article originally appeared in the Spring 1985 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Runaways and Renegades: Piracy in Colonial North Carolina

North Carolina’s Outer Banks (and their treacherous geography) provided a safe hiding place for pirates, renegades, and runaways during the colonial era. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Running the Blockade

The Union tried to cut the Confederacy off from badly needed supplies such as food, clothing, and weapons by blockading all southern ports. Blockade-runners attempted to circumvent these blockades and deliver supplies to the Confederacy. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Schools for Freed People

Enslaved people in the South gained their freedom after the Civil War (1861–1865), but freedom alone did not solve their problems; most had not been allowed to attend school and did not know how to read or write. Examine the first movements aimed at educating freed slaves. This article appeared in the Spring 1997 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Sea Monsters, Railroads, and Modern Highways--Mapping Out History

Maps are a primary source that reproduces, usually on a flat surface, selected features of a part or all of the earth. Historians may use maps to find out how a region has changed over time. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Searching for Greener Pastures: Out-migration in the 1800s and 1900s

North Carolina was the third-most-populous state in the Union in 1790, but by 1860 it had dropped to 12th in population. Learn how and why people left North Carolina. Who left and where did they go? This article appeared in the Spring 1995 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Secrets, Supplies, and a Big Skirt

This article describes the actions of a native North Carolina woman named Emeline Pigott who served as a spy for the Confederacy. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Service in War

Did you know that there are around 185,000 American Indian military veterans in the United States? One of them, North Carolinian Charles George, won the Congressional Medal of Honor during the Korean War. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Sewing for the Confederacy

While the men of the Confederacy took up arms to fight, the women of the Confederacy took up needle and thread in order to make uniforms and other supplies for the army. This article originally appeared in the Spring 1988 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Shoot-out at Bond Schoolhouse: a little Civil War skirmish that had big repercussions

On February 12, 1863 members of the Confederate militia, under the leadership of Captain James West, approached the Bond Schoolhouse in Yadkinville for the purpose of apprehending sixteen Confederate deserters and draft dodgers. The confrontation turned into a shoot-out between the two groups in which West and another Confederate militia member were killed. Two of the sixteen men in the schoolhouse also died—Solomon Hinshaw and Eck Allgood. The remaining Confederate deserters escaped to the mountains and later to Kentucky where many joined the Union army, including Jesse Dobbins who was later indicted for killing West. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Shooting Past the Color Line

How desegration affected high school basketball is told through the story of Ashley High School in the late 1960s. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Shortages, Substitutes, and Salt: Food during the Civil War in North Carolina

During the Civil War many North Carolinians--both the soldiers and the civilians--faced food shortages. Sometimes substitutes were found for the scarce food item, while other times, people had to do without. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Show Me the Money: The Business of Sports

This article examines how money plays a part in the sports industry. The story of the Carolina Hurricanes is highlighted to demonstrate the role of money in sports. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Sid Luck: A Traditional Seagrove Potter

Seagrove, North Carolina, is an area famous for its pottery. A brief history of this area is presented along with some information about one of the well-known potters from this region, Sid Luck. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Simon Fernandez: Navigator, Privateer--and Villain?

Was ship pilot Simon Fernandez the self-serving man described in the writings of John White and portrayed in the play "The Lost Colony?" Or was he a responsible navigator who sought to safely return his ship and men to England before the dangerous hurricane season? This article appeared in the Fall 2007 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Sitting Down for a Cup of Coffee and Civil Rights

A Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina became the setting for the first in a series of non-violent sit-ins for Civil Rights in the South. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Solving Modern Problems in Agriculture

Dr. Mike Boyette, a professor at North Carolina State University, grew up understanding the problems that farmers experience. He became an agricultural engineer to find solutions to some of those problems. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Sounding Off on Radio

In the 1930s live radio became a mainstream of popular culture in the United States. Radio provided news, offered escape from problems, connected people in distant areas, and shaped public opinion. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

South Dakota v. North Carolina: Supreme Court Showdown

The US Supreme Court case South Dakota v. North Carolina marked the first time one state had sued another state in the Supreme Court for payment of a debt. South Dakota won the suit and North Carolina had to pay that state $664,000 (in 2008 dollars). This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

State Boat: Shad Boat

To meet the needs of commercial fishermen in North Carolina after the Civil War, George Washington Creef developed the shad boat, which could carry larger loads without increasing its draft. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 19 September 2003.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

State Flower: Dogwood

The North Carolina state flower isn't really a flower; it's actually a tree! Learn about the dogwood, its history, and its uses. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 12 September 2003.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

State Fruit: Scuppernong Grape; State Vegetable: Sweet Potato

Although the scuppernong grape did not become the state fruit until 2001, this little grape's role in North Carolina history predates the exploration and colonization of the Cape Fear River valley. The sweet potato became the state vegetable in the 1990s, but its edible presence in North Carolina goes back to the dinosaurs! This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 26 September 2003.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

State Nickname: The Tar Heel State

What legends and stories lie behind North Carolina's nickname? Find out about the possible origins of "Tar Heel" that may go back to colonial days. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 5 September 2003.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Steam Power--Not Just for Railroads

In 1900 Thomas H. White developed a steam-powered car. His company continued to build cars that ran on this “alternative” energy source until 1909 when they switched to the gas-powered engine. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Step by Step to Choosing, Learning, and Telling a Story

Simply tell a story over and over, repeating it until it's yours. This and other useful storytelling advice can be found in this informative article. This article appeared in the Spring 2002 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Stitching History Together: Using Artifacts as Primary Sources

Curators at museums use artifacts in order to discover how people from the past lived. This article details how one type of artifact, a sewing sampler, can help a curator find out about the lives of historic women. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Stories and Storytelling Long Ago and Today

Storytelling has been used the world over to entertain and excite audiences. Learn about ancient epics and a newer form of storytelling: spoonerisms. This article appeared in the Spring 2002 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Strangers in Town: New Bern's Federal Occupation

Letters, memoirs, sketches, and other primary sources have helped historians piece together and remember the story of New Bern’s (North Carolina) Federal occupation during the Civil War. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Studying and Applying Population Data

North Carolina’s state demographer, Bill Tillman, studies the population data gathered in the state. Births, deaths, enrollments in elementary schools, and city growth are some of the facts he studies. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Studying the Remains of the Past

How do we know about early American Indians in North Carolina? They left no written records, and so we learn about them through archaeology. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Surry County's Original Siamese Twins

Chang and Eng Bunker along with their wives and numerous children lived in Surry County from 1839 until their death in 1873. What made these two men unique is that they were conjoined Siamese twins. This article provides a brief biography of their life. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Sweet and Clean: A Glance at the History of Infant Feeding

Although doctors contend that a mother’s milk is best for infants, scientific advances in baby formula now offer a safe choice for mothers to feed their newborns. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

THJHA Essay Contest Winner: A Boy's Journal

2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Association contest winner, elementary division. A boy's fictional journal account of journey to and life within the 1587 Roanoke Island colony. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 ITar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Take Your Pick of North Carolina Apples

Although not native to North Carolina, early settlers found that apples grew well in the western portion of the state. From its earliest use as a food source for people and animals, the apple industry has flourished in North Carolina and now is a major industry in the state. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Talking Feet: The History of Clogging

Clogging is a type of folk dance in which performers use their feet as instruments. Clogging can be traced back to the Appalachian Mountains over two hundred years ago, and it is a type of dance that is still performed today. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Tar Heel Generals in Gray

The careers of two of the youngest major generals in the Confederate army, Robert F. Hoke and Stephen Dodson Ramseur, both from North Carolina, are outlined. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Tar Heel Junior Historian Essay Contest Winner: North Carolina's Technology: Past Present and Future (by David High)

Technology has changed North Carolina dramatically in the last 200 years, and technological development paints a bright future. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Tar Heel Junior Historian Essay Contest Winner: The Invention of the Airplane (by Emily Camplejohn)

On December 17, 1903, Orville and Wilbur Wright made the first sustained powered airplane flight. Because of their achievement, we are able to go places we never would have gone. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Tar Heels in Space

Discover the Tar Heel State's connections to America's space race. From NASA administrator James Webb to Challenger pilot Michael J. Smith, numerous North Carolinians have supported the exploration of the "Final Frontier." This article appeared in the Fall 2003 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Technology and the North Carolina State Fair

The North Carolina State Fair was initially designed to educate, not entertain, farmers with the latest agricultural technologies. Today, the carnival rides and cutting-edge exhibitions attract more than 700,000 people per year. But technology remains central to the state fair experience. This article appeared in the Fall 2002 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The "Modern" Civil War: Advances in Military and Naval Technology

This article examines four crucial advances in military and naval technology during the Civil War: the transition from smoothbore weapons to rifled weapons; the switch from sailing ships to steam-powered ships; the development of ironclad warships and submarines; and the use of torpedoes and land mines. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The 1920s: A Decade of Change

After victory in World War I, Americans experienced a decade of growth, invention, creativity, and change. Discover the innovations brought about during the Roaring Twenties. This article appeared in the Spring 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The African American State Fair

In 1879 Charles N. Hunter and the Colored Industrial Association of North Carolina organized an African American fair to demonstrate the progress made by African Americans in North Carolina since emancipation, The fair showcased industrial and agricultural displays while promoting African Americans' achievements and racial harmony. This article appeared in the Fall 2002 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Agricultural Ecnomoy of Antebellum Life

During the antebellum era in North Carolina, agriculture was the mainstay of economic life. Many North Carolinians farmed in order to make a living. Farmers were classified as either planters or yeoman, depending on the size of their farms and how many enslaved persons (if any) they utilized. Some advances in farming technology were made during this period, but for the most part, farming was labor-intensive and unprofitable. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The American Soldier

What kinds of guns and other weapons were used in the American Revolution? What were the armies like, and how did the soldiers fight? When we answer these questions, we learn a great deal about what war was like in the 1700s. And we learn about what the American soldier used during the war. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1992 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Archaeology of Early North Carolina

Archaeology helps us learn about the earliest American Indians in North Carolina. The first major period in the state's prehistory is the Paleo-Indian period, from which archaeologists have found stone spear points, called “fluted points.” This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Art of John White

Gentleman artist John White's drawings of the New World revealed American Indians to be similar to Europeans--though some differences did exist, among them language, clothing, religion, and social organization. The drawings were widely distributed to encourage further English exploration and settlement. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Backcountry Grows Up

Colonists immigrated to the Piedmont of North Carolina along two routes, the Great Indian Trading Path and the Great Wagon Road. Many of the immigrants to the Piedmont were Scots-Irish or German. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Box That Changed the World

In 1956 Robeson County native Malcom P. McLean watched his invention—the shipping container— in action for the first time. His invention changed the world of shipping. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Civil War on the North Carolina Home Front

This article provides a general overview of the Civil War’s affect on North Carolina’s home front. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2000 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Civil War, Memory, and Lieutenant Mangum

This introductory article to the spring 2011 issue of the Tar Heel Junior Historian uses the story of one Confederate solider, William “Preston” Mangum, to demonstrate the effect of the Civil War on one family, the state of North Carolina, and our lives today. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Colony of Carolina

As settlers colonized North Carolina, they gave names to places they encountered. Sometimes they retained Indian place-names or created Anglicized versions of Indian words. The names of local tribes were also used. Some areas were named after local geographic features or well-known people associated with the colony. Learn more about North Carolina's colonial place-names. This article appeared in the Spring 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Day the Lights Came On

The Rural Electrification Agency (REA), a New Deal program, offered low-interest government loans for the construction of power lines in rural areas. The electricity made available by the REA changed how rural North Carolinians lived their lives. This article originally appeared in the Spring 1985 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Depression Blues…& Reds…& Yellows…Artists of the New Deal

Some of the New Deal programs implemented during the Great Depression provided work for unemployed artists and musicians. One North Carolina artist who benefited from these programs was James McLean who painted murals in Raleigh, Concord, and Greensboro. This article originally appeared in the Spring 1985 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Extraordinary "Ordinary"

Colonial ordinaries (also called a tavern, a public house or entertainment, or an inn) became gathering places for local and traveling men from all walks of life. Ordinaries offered meals and lodging, as well as spots for socializing, talking politics, and doing business that might range from legal work to barbering. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Fayetteville Arsenal: A Place of Pride and Community Effort

During the Civil War the Fayetteville Arsenal produced guns and ammunition for the Confederate army. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2000 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The First People of North Carolina

American Indians in North Carolina first encountered European explorers in the 1500s. Interactions between Europeans and Indians continued with the establishment of the first European settlement in the present-day United States. This article is the introduction to the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Five Classes of Women in Antebellum North Carolina

Although movies and television usually depict antebellum women as southern belles living on plantations, the reality was the southern woman fell into one of many different classes. Some belonged to the planter class, but many more were the wives of yeoman farmers or were too poor to even own land. Other southern women were black and were either free or enslaved. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Gatling Gun

After the Civil War broke out, Hertford County native Richard Jordan Gatling developed a powerful gun that could fire more than 200 bullets per minute. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Ghost Train of Bostian's Bridge

Around 3:00 a.m. on August 27, 1891, a passenger train on its way to Asheville left its tracks crossing over Bostian’s Bridge. The train plunged into the creek below, killing twenty-two of the train’s passengers. The cause for the disaster was never determined. Legend has it that on the anniversary of the tragedy you can see the ghost train. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Gift of the Blue Ridge Parkway

What makes the Blue Ridge Parkway different from other highways? Find out how this scenic road came to be in North Carolina.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Golden Age of Sports

Hailed as the Golden Age of Sports, the 1920s produced some of the best baseball, football, and basketball players in North Carolina history. This article appeared in the Spring 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Golden Years

During the 1930s and 1940s the entertainment industry flourished as people used music and films as a way to escape the hardships of their own lives. This article originally appeared in the Spring 1985 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Great Migration and North Carolina

Beginning in the 1910s, large numbers of African Americans left North Carolina to look for better jobs in war industries and to escape the segregation and Jim Crow laws in the South. Many of the North Carolinians who participated in the Great Migration moved to areas like New York City's Harlem, which had a large southern black population. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Great Philadelphia Wagon Road

The Great Philadelphia Wagon Road stretched from just outside Philadelphia, through the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia, and into North Carolina. Many settlers who entered the colonies through Philadelphia moved south into North Carolina along this route. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Great Wagon Road

Moving around the country used to be a lot more difficult. Read how settlers made their way from Pennsylvania to North Carolina over a narrow, muddy, and uneven trail called the Great Wagon Road.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Greatest Pilot on Earth

Winner of the first transcontinental air race in 1919, North Carolina's Belvin Maynard flew to fame as the "greatest pilot on earth." Read about this aviation pioneer. This article appeared in the Fall 2003 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Greensboro Four

Sometimes eating lunch can make a statement. When four university students sat at the Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro in 1960, they were not just ordering lunch. Their actions set off a wave of nonviolent civil rights protests in the state and across the country. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 19 March 2004.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The History of the State Fair

Find out the history behind the state's oldest and most important annual celebration: the North Carolina State Fair. Part educational institution, part commercial festival, part entertainment, the state fair attracts over 700,000 visitors each year. This article appeared in the Fall 2002 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The House That Harriet Built

On August 24, 1869, Charlotte native Harriet Morrison Irwin received a patent for her hexagonal-design house. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Klu Klux Klan in North Carolina and the Battle of Maxton Field

The Klu Klux Klan used fear to intimidate African Americans and American Indians. Read an account of how the Lumbee Indians united to break up a Klan rally in Robeson County. This article appeared in the Fall 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Loss of a Town

Discover Haywood, a North Carolina town that no longer exists. Read this article to find out more about how Haywood came to be and how it eventually disappeared. This article appeared in the Spring 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Lost Colony

The tale of the Lost Colony is often told in North Carolina, but what do some people think really happened to the missing settlers?  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Man Who Helped the World Breath Easier

Lunsford Richardson II, of Johnston County, wanted to do something that would help others. While working in his drugstore, he invented medicines and eventually created Vicks VapoRub. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The N.C. Commission of Indian Affairs

The North Carolina Commission of Indian Affairs was established in 1971 following the national Civil Rights era and the American Indian Movement. The commission works to support and promote Indian communities in the state. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Naming of a North Carolina Railroad Town

The town of Spencer, near Salisbury in Rowan County, was named for one of the nation's railroad leaders, Samuel Spencer. Read this article in the Spring 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine to learn more about Samuel Spencer and the North Carolina Railroad. This article appeared in the Spring 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Needy Doing Something Useful: The WPA Goes to Work

The Works Progress Administration (WPA) was created by President Franklin Roosevelt to provide jobs to the unemployed during the Great Depression. This article outlines the effect of the WPA on North Carolina. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The North Carolina Gold Rush

Gold was discovered in North Carolina in 1799, and in 1805 newspaper reports of gold mining sparked a gold rush in the state. Most of the important mines were located near Charlotte, and large numbers of European miners moved to the area. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Occaneechi People: Experiencing a Cultural Renaissance

Since reorganizing in 1984, the Occaneechi tribe has worked to improve the economic and educational opportunities available to tribal members. The State of North Carolina has officially recognized the Occaneechi as a tribe. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Quakers and Their War of Resistance

When the Civil War began, many people of different religious faiths supported the Confederate war effort. A number of Protestant ministers even served in the military. Yet, one religious group—the Quakers—went against majority opinion and refused to support the war. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2000 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Salisbury Confederate Prison

The town of Salibury, North Carolina, hosted a Confederate prison which operated from 1861 through 1865. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2000 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Scots-Irish in North Carolina

The Scots-Irish journey to North Carolina took place over many years. Today their influence can be seen in Presbyterian churches, religious practices, music, food, and log cabin styles. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 26 February 2009.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The State Flag

North Carolina's flag, like the state itself, was transformed during the Civil War. Learn about the adoption of and alterations to the state flag made in 1861. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 3 October 2003.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The State and Its Tribes

Eight American Indian tribes in North Carolina are recognized by the state, but only the Cherokee are also recognized by the federal government. Four organizations representing Indians living in the state's urban areas are also recognized by the state. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Three White Classes in Antebellum North Carolina

During the antebellum era whites generally fell into one of three social classes—poor white class, yeoman farmer class, and upper class. This article briefly explores the lives of the people who belonged to each class. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Tuscarora War: American Indians Fight for Independence

In 1711 a wide array of local American Indian groups—including the Tuscarora—banned together in order to drive out European colonists in eastern North Carolina. Their attempt ultimately failed and these tribes continued to face declining numbers, stolen possessions, and loss of their native culture. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Two Black Classes of Antebellum North Carolina

In antebellum North Carolina, African Americans were characterized as either free or enslaved. This article examines what each of these classifications meant as well as the lives of the African Americans who belonged to these classes. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Ups and Downs of a Seafaring Man

Like the sea he loved, Otway Burns’s life was full of ups and downs. The swashbuckling sea captain became North Carolina’s first navel hero during the War of 1812. Later he built one of the state’s first steamboats and served in the legislature. Yet he died poor and unnoticed, living his last years as a lonely lightboat keeper on the Pamlico Sound. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Very Curious Case of Colonial North Carolina

This article provides an overview of Colonial North Carolina’s history. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Waldenses of Valdese

The Waldenses moved to North Carolina when their population outgrew the alpine valleys between Italy and France. They founded the town of Valdese in 1893 in Burke County. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The War within the War in the Mountain Region

Although no official Civil War battles took place in the western part of North Carolina, the war and the hardships it caused were as real for residents there as they were for people living near Bentonville or Wilmington. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Why of the American Revolution

The reasons for North Carolina’s participation in the American Revolution are outlined, the battles that took place in North Carolina are examined, and the political development of North Carolina after revolutionaries expelled the last royal governor of North Carolina from the colony is explained. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1992 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Wild Horses of Currituck

Various theories abound as to how the wild horses of North Carolina’s Currituck Outer Banks have come to inhabit that area. However, most historians agree that these horses are descended from the fine horses of Spanish conquistadors and have made the Outer Banks their home for almost five hundred years. Unfortunately, due to increasing property development, these horses’ homes are being threatened and the number of horses in Currituck County have dwindled to around one hundred. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Women of Somerset Place

Read this article to learn more about the women of Somerset Place, in Washington County, one of North Carolina's largest plantations. Somerset Place was the home of more than 300 slaves, most of whom were women. This article appeared in the Spring 1994 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

The Wright Brothers in North Carolina

Many have contributed to aviation history, but the Wright brothers started it all. Read the story of their first flight at Kitty Hawk. This article appeared in the Fall 2003 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

There's History in Those Sticks and Stones!

Gravemarkers can tell us information about the people buried in the cemetery including their religion, name, gender, and occupation. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Time Line of Exploration

Pre-history to twentieth century time line detailing forays into present-day North Carolina by early explorers. This time line appears in the Fall 2007 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Tiny Broadwick: The First Lady of Parachuting

A daring female balloonist with the carnival, Georgia Ann Thompson Broadwick, better known as Tiny, jumped into aviation history as the first person to free-fall from an airplane. Learn more about the First Lady of Parachuting. This article appeared in the Fall 2003 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Tom Davis: Entrepreneur of the Air

Founder of North Carolina's Piedmont Airlines, Tom Davis guided his company through some tough times in the airline industry. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 12 December 2003.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Touching Base with a Tuskegee Airman

The all-black Tuskegee Airmen differed from other World War II air squadrons, and not just because of the brightly painted tails on their fighter planes. Read North Carolinian Wilson Vash Eagleson's recollections of his time as a pilot with the famous squadron. This article appeared in the Fall 2003 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Traditional Cherokee Pottery

Stamped pottery is a style of pottery decoration that was used almost 2,000 years ago by American Indians in the southern Appalachians. Wooden paddles with carved designs are pressed into the clay before it is fired to make the designs. This article appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Travel by Railroads, Cars, and Planes in the 1920s

One woman's determination saved thousands of North Carolinians from getting stuck in the mud. Read how Harriet Berry and the Good Roads Association led the crusade to improve and pave the state's highways in the 1920s. This article appeared in the Spring 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Tryon Toy-Makers and Wood Carvers

Eleanor Vance and Charlotte Yale's initial efforts to teach carving to the boys in their Buncombe County neighborhood, eventually lead to the development of Biltmore Estate Industries, Tryon Toy-Makers and Wood-Carvers, and the Tryon Craft School. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 10 December 2008.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Turning Ideas into Reality

North Carolinians of all races and genders have invented many different products, such as Pepsi-Cola, a cotton cultivator, and a radiographscope. These inventions help shape our daily lives. This article appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Uncovering a Person's Story: Edward R. "Ned" Rawls

Primary sources like documents and oral history can help historians put together the story of Edward R. “Ned” Rawls, one of North Carolina’s Reconstruction-era African American lawmakers. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Union or Disunion? North Carolina Votes for Secession

Secession was a controversial issue in North Carolina throughout the 1850s and early 1860s. Some people, called Unionist, wanted NC to stay a part of the United States while others felt that NC should join other southern states in opposing Republican leadership. Rising tension over slavery, the secession of other southern states, the election of Lincoln, and finally, Lincoln’s call for troops to protect Fort Sumter led to North Carolina’s secession from the Union in May 1861. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

United States Colored Troops: Fighting for Freedom

During the Civil War African American men from both the north and the south joined the Union army. These men were known collectively as members of the United States Colored Troops. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Vernon Haywood

Can you imagine flying more than 6,000 hours in your lifetime? North Carolina's Colonel Vernon Haywood began flying in World War II with the Tuskegee Airmen, an African American fighter squadron. By the time he retired in 1971, he had spent enough hours behind the controls of military airplanes to fill 250 days! This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 7 November 2003.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Views through Pen and Ink: North Carolina's Antebellum Literature Records an Era

Literature from the antebellum era in North Carolina helps to illuminate what life was like during this period as well as what antebellum North Carolinians were interested in reading about. Literature during this period discussed slavery, the Cherokee, and life among the planter class. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Virginia Dare and the Lost Colony: Fact and Legend

No one knows the fate of Virginia Dare and the Lost Colony. Stories and legends have been created to help explain what might have happened. Explore one of these legends. This article appeared in the Spring 2000 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Walking Out: The Great Textile Strike of 1934

In 1934, textile mill workers in Gaston County, North Carolina, went on strike to protest poor working conditions. Although their strike focused national attention on the plight of the textile worker, the federal government did relatively little to remedy the hardships of these workers. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Weekend Time Machines

Reenactors are people who dress as historical figures (both famous and ordinary) and act out historical events. Some reenactors participate in recreating the battles of the American Revolution. This article was written by a Revolutionary War reenactor and he details why he became a reenactor as well as his duties as one. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1992 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

What Can I Learn from a Church?

What can you learn from studying a church? This article uses First Presbyterian Church in Wilmington to outline what a church can tell us about history. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

What Do Explorers Do When They Are Not Exploring? John Lawson's Everyday Life

While John Lawson may be best remembered as an explorer, naturalist, and author, he was also a successful businessman, civil leader, and family man. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

What We Can't Do Alone, We Can Do Together

Robeson County in North Carolina is the most ethnically diverse rural county in the United States. Discover the positive changes that take place when people of various backgrounds come together for one purpose. This article appeared in the Fall 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

What is a symphonic drama?

The Lost Colony is a symphonic drama. The play takes place on the site depicted in the play and the work includes music, dance, pantomime, and poetic dialogue. This article appeared in the Fall 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

What's Eating You, Lazybones?

During the early 1900s doctors, public heath officials, and northern businessmen worked to eradicate hookworm disease in the southern United States, including North Carolina. This article examines how hookworms became such a public health concern in the twentieth century as well as the ways different groups tried to steam the rate of hookworm disease. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Wheeler Airlines: An American First

Wheeler Airlines, the first minority-owned airline in the country, carried passengers and freight from Raleigh-Durham Airport to destinations as far away as New York. Read the story of Durham native Warren Hervey Wheeler's struggle to become a commerical pilot with his own fleet of airplanes at a time when most major airlines refused to employ African American pilots. This article appeared in the Fall 2003 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

When Dinner Wasn't Quick or Easy

Modern meals are planned around the family’s schedule, but this was not the case two hundred years ago. In fact, two hundred years ago, the family planned its schedule around meals! Technology has greatly affected what we eat and how we eat it. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

When World War II Was Fought Off North Carolina's Beaches

Military action was not restricted solely to Europe and the Pacific during World War II. German U-boasts patrolled parts of the United States coast including the North Carolina shoreline. The German U-boats were responsible for several attacks on American ships off of the NC coast until increased air and naval patrols by the American forces, as well as the efforts of vigilant American volunteers, help to repel this threat. This article focuses on the impact that German U-boats had on the North Carolina coast. This article appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Which Side to Take: Revolutionary or Loyalist?

Although it seems like a foregone conclusion to many people today, the decision to join the American patriots in revolting against the English government was not an easy one. Personal circumstances often influenced one’s decision. This article examines why people choose to either side with either the loyalists or revolutionaries. The story of one North Carolinian, Connor Dowd, is relayed to demonstrate the complicated nature of declaring allegiance to one side or the other. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1992 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Who Did That Sign Say?

Today more than 400 highways, bridges, ferries, and other structures have honorary names, and the state transportation board names another 15 to 20 structures each year. This doesn't include the thousands of secondary roads and city streets that county boards of commissioners and city or town councils have the authority to name. Learn more about the process of naming places in North Carolina. This article appeared in the Spring 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Who Painted the Canteens?

Museum curators are often called upon to research the artifacts that a museum acquires. Oftentimes, as is the case with this article, solid historical research using primary documents can help to solve mysteries surrounding an artifact. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Who's In Charge Here, Anyway?

Between 1664 and 1711, 16 different men held the title of governor of Albemarle or deputy governor of the Carolina province. Few governors lasted very long on the job. Many were removed from office by violence and rebellion. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2012 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Will We Ever See an Easleyville?

Do you ever wonder how some North Carolina places got their names? Read this article to find out! This article appeared in the Spring 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

William C. Lee: "Father of the Airborne"

North Carolina has not always been home to the Army Airborne. It was not until the eve of the U.S. entry into World War II that General William C. Lee, known as the "Father of the Airborne," developed the first platoon of paratroopers. Lee's 101st Airborne Division jumped to fame at the Battle of Normandy. This article appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer, 31 October 2003.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

William R. Davie House: A Building Tells Its Story

In the field of historic preservation buildings themselves often become the primary source of information. Buildings can teach us a lot about the lives and accomplishments of the people who lived and worked in them.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

William Woods Holden and the North Carolina Peace Movement during the Civil War

William Woods Holden, the editor of the Raleigh newspaper The North Carolina Standard, called for meetings to demand peace negotiations with the Union during the Civil War. After the Civil War he became the governor of N.C. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2000 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Wilmington Helps Weld Allied Victory

During World War II, the North Carolina Shipbuilding Company built 243 ships for the Maritime Commission and U.S. Navy in Wilmington, N.C. The shipbuilding activities provided jobs for many North Carolinians who were still struggling with the economic devastation that resulted from the Great Depresssion. This article appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Winning the Fight for Progress—North Carolina’s antebellum years begin: 1830-1850

This article includes a broad overview of the major events characterizing the antebellum period in North Carolina. The author discusses the perception by other states that North Carolina was backward both economically and socially (i.e. the state’s Rip Van Winkle moniker) during this period. He also discusses slavery and yeomen farmers during the antebellum period in North Carolina. This article originally appeared in the Fall 1996 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

With Deliberate Speed: North Carolina and School Desegregation

Discover how North Carolinians reacted to the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision ruling school segregation unconstitutional. Both African Americans and American Indians were affected by segregation, but they disagreed about whether integration was best for their communities. This article appeared in the Fall 2004 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Women Step Up to Serve

North Carolinian women were active participants in World War II. This article examines a few of the women who made a difference by serving in the military during a time in which women were not always encouraged to do so. This article appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Women's Contribution to the Cause

As thousands of men took up arms in the Confederate army, thousands of women supported the cause by making uniforms, tents, leather goods, socks, and many other goods men in the army needed. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2000 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Work and Opportunity: African Americans in the CCC

The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was established by President Roosevelt in order to provide employment opportunities to men between the ages of 18 to 25 during the Great Depression. Members of the CCC usually worked on environmental projects like soil conservation and reforestation. Although the CCC was not supposed to be segregated, in reality the companies were divided among racial lines. This article examines the CCC, and in particular, the contributions of its African American members. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2010 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

World War II Touched Lives in Every Community

What was it like to live in North Carolina during World War II? Dr. Annette Ayers examines the effect the war had on life in the Surry County community of Shoals. This article appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

You Can't Miss It: Roadside Fun

North Carolina is home to many weird and wonderful landmarks with historical tales to tell. This article highlights several of these Tar Heel sites including the giant chest of drawers in High Point, the giant Duncan Phyfe chair in Thomasville, the shell service station in Winston-Salem, the world’s largest frying pan in Rose Hill, the big coffeepot in Winston-Salem, and the Futuro house in Frisco. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2008 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Your Food Has Ancestors, Too

Have you ever thought about your dinner? Just like humans have ancestors, so do the foods we eat. This article examines where many of the foods North Carolinians enjoy-like corn, sugar, potato, and various meats came from. This article originally appeared in the Spring 2007 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Zebulon B. Vance: A Confederate Nationalist

Zebulon Vance served as North Carolina’s governor during the Civil War. Although he did not initially support secession, once North Carolina left the Union he became a staunch supporter of the Confederacy. This article originally appeared in the Fall 2000 Tar Heel Junior Historian Magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Classroom Activities

Food for Thought

Compute percentages of increase in food prices during the Civil War and use the same increases to predict prices today if similar shortages and inflation were to occur. This lesson plan is part of the History-in-a-Box kit titled North Carolina and the Civil War.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Friends in Liberty: North Carolina and the American Revolution Teacher Supplement

Activities, ideas, and resources designed to supplement and reinforce information presented in the video, Friends in Liberty: North Carolina in the American Revolution.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

How About Some Recognition?

Explore the important contemporary issue of tribal recognition sought by American Indian groups in North Carolina.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Pottery Making: The Coil Method

Explore how American Indian potters created their pottery. Try your hand at the coil method. This lesson plan is from the History-in-a-Box kit titled From Earth and Fire: North Carolina Pottery.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Settlement of North Carolina

Using articles from a THJH magazine, gain an understanding of North Carolina's settlement by various groups in different regions and during various periods of history.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Studying and Applying Population Data

North Carolina’s state demographer, Bill Tillman, studies the population data gathered in the state. Births, deaths, enrollments in elementary schools, and city growth are some of the facts he studies. This article appeared in the Spring 2006 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Time Lines

Eighteenth-Century North Carolina Time Line

Highlights major events and people throughout North Carolina history, circa 40,000 BC to the present. Includes entries on early exploration, wars, government, politics, immigration and migration, industry, education, arts, and entertainment.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Nineteenth-Century North Carolina Time Line

Highlights major events and people throughout North Carolina history, circa 40,000 BC to the present. Includes entries on early exploration, wars, government, politics, immigration and migration, industry, education, arts, and entertainment.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina American Indian History Time Line

Highlights Indian history in North Carolina from circa 40,000 BC to the present. Includes both general and tribal entries.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina Women's History Time Line

Highlights the pioneering efforts of North Carolina women in various fields, including education, science, medicine, law, and politics.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

North Carolina in World War II Time Line

Highlights seminal events of World War II, with a focus on North Carolina’s wartime role.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Pre-Sixteenth-Century North Carolina Time Line

Highlights major events and people throughout North Carolina history, circa 40,000 BC to the present. Includes entries on early exploration, wars, government, politics, immigration and migration, industry, education, arts, and entertainment.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Seventeenth-Century North Carolina Time Line

Highlights major events and people throughout North Carolina history, circa 40,000 BC to the present. Includes entries on early exploration, wars, government, politics, immigration and migration, industry, education, arts, and entertainment.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Sixteenth-Century North Carolina Time Line

Highlights major events and people throughout North Carolina history, circa 40,000 BC to the present. Includes entries on early exploration, wars, government, politics, immigration and migration, industry, education, arts, and entertainment.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Time Line: American Indians in North Carolina

This time line explores the history of American Indians in North Carolina over 40,000 years of history. It was included in the Fall 2005 issue of Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Twentieth-Century North Carolina Time Line

Highlights major events and people throughout North Carolina history, circa 40,000 BC to the present. Includes entries on early exploration, wars, government, politics, immigration and migration, industry, education, arts, and entertainment.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Videos

American Indians in North Carolina

Explore the fascinating history and contemporary culture of North Carolina's American Indian communities. 10 minutes  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Don't You Know There's a War On?

This program explores the inspiring firsthand accounts of eleven individuals who experienced World War II. These men and women belong to what broadcast journalist Tom Brokaw calls the "greatest generation." They are ordinary citizens who did extraordinary things for their country. Whether they saw combat or collected scrap metal, North Carolinians joined countless Americans who served, sacrificed, and persevered during the war. 33 minutes  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Friends in Liberty: North Carolina in the American Revolution

Through the eyes of a fourteen-year-old boy and his friend, we learn about North Carolina during the American Revolution.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Moccasins to Motorcars

Students will discover how modes of transportation have changed over time and how those changes have affected North Carolinians. 17 minutes  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Virtual Field Trips

American Indians in North Carolina

Explore the fascinating history and contemporary culture of North Carolina's American Indian communities. Students will learn and share information about the state's tribes through small group activities, video clips, and touch objects.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Behind the Scenes at the Museum: Who Works Here?

What is it like to work in a museum? Who brings to life all the "stuff" of history? Who takes care of the museum building, trains the volunteers, publishes the documents, creates the Web site, builds the exhibits, conducts research, and stores the artifacts? Watch museum professionals in action and learn about their jobs. Understand the vocabulary of a museum. Play "Museum Jeopardy" for prizes!  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Don't You Know There's a War On?

This virtual field trip focuses on World War II from a North Carolina perspective. Hands-on activities, images and voices from World War II participants, and interactive discussion help students learn about life for North Carolinians on the home front and at war.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

History Mystery

How do historians unravel mysteries? What do objects tell us about how people lived long ago? By participating in interactive discussions and hands-on activities, students learn why the investigative skills of observation, hypothesis, and analysis are important in understanding history. Choose from five History Mystery topics: Colonial Life, Health and Healing, Rural Home Life, Civil War, and Tools and Gadgets  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Moccasins to Motorcars: A History of Transportation in North Carolina

Students will participate in interactive discussions and hands-on activities to discover how modes of transportation have changed over time and how these changes have affected North Carolinians.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Rhythm and Roots of North Carolina Music

Did you know that music is part of history too? Explore North Carolina's musical roots and discover instruments with special ties to our state. Students will enjoy making music and hear Tar Heel musicians' recordings on the museum's own jukebox.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).

Virtual Scrapbooks

Professional Development

History-in-a-Box Kits

Educator Notebooks

North Carolina Legends Educator Notebook

North Carolinians love our legendary historical figures. Learn the myths and realities of characters such as Blackbeard and Flora MacDonald. This handy resource guide is designed for fourth-grade social studies, language arts, and math educators. Purchase the North Carolina Legends Educator Notebook for useful lesson plans and resources.  details
direct link: View resource now (opens in new window).